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FARMING

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And it was a lot of work to get those eggs
Tribal officials said they felt an urgency to act because of the increase in proposed large livestock operations on and near the reservation
"They picked us," says Mark Grimes, who runs Homestead Arts Farm in Pine Island with his wife, Lori Grimes, welcoming people to learn about their fuzzy friends.
Lakes area leaders get to work alongside industry professionals.

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“I don’t think anything comes out of sitting in a cell,” said Kathy Lionberger, division director at the Northeast Regional Corrections Center.
When Jay Clark and Tammy Soma Clark began Rochester's Apples R Us in 2009 they only had 300 trees planted, now in 2022, they have over 12,500 with plans to plant a third orchard section by 2024.
The 15-acre lot of apple trees in Rochester is now almost 10 times in size since it was purchased in 1962.
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Columnist John Wetrosky recalls life on the farm
Dave, Tim, Alvin, Gary and Eddie Schubert put in more than 150 hours restoring a 1938 John Deere hay loader that was sitting unused since the 1960s.
“In the initial years, we felt kind of embarrassed that we were the ones to take that leap," said Veronica Gaidelis-Langer, owner of Sweet Land Farm. "I am so proud of how far we’ve come and how much we’ve learned.”

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The incident occurred while he was repairing the round baler on Tuesday, July 19.
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But farmers should know not to get their hopes up too high.
As kids, we spent many summers bumping along the dirt roads in Dad’s pickup as he patrolled creeks and ditches — ever vigilant to any splash of yellow representing leafy spurge. He would screech to a halt and we'd trot to the back of the truck to pull out hoses so we could douse every offending patch with herbicide. These days, we are more prone to limping than trotting. But we're still spraying spurge, Tammy Swift says.

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