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CROPS

A legislative field event at Albert Lea Seed on July 26 highlighted the work that’s been done in the past decade by more than 50 researchers of the University of Minnesota’s Forever Green Initiative.
Swany White Flour Mills, Ltd., in downtown Freeport, Minnesota, is one of the longest-running family-owned flour mills in Minnesota, and shares a common family tree with Famo Feeds Inc., a much larger livestock feed mill along Interstate 94, west of town.
Epitome Energy no longer has plans for a biodiesel refinery for the $300 million facility in Polk County.
Across Steele County, about 15% of the acres weren’t planted this spring, said Johnny Jorgensen, a Hunter (North Dakota) Insurance Agency who sells Rural Community Insurance Services and NAU Country federal crop insurance. Traill County, which borders Steele County on the east, has about the same percentage of unplanted acreage and Barnes County has from 35 to 40% prevented planting acres, Jorgensen estimated.

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"Across Agweek Country, hundreds of farmers, ranchers and other agriculturalists are deciding whether this will be their last full-time year in ag. They still enjoy what they do, but they also realize it might be time to step back."
Kernza has been getting some buzz in recent years for its multiple uses as a forage, a grain that can be used in the kitchen, and a plant beneficial to water quality and the environment. Alexandria High School in Minnesota is planting test plots to help its ag students learn more.
You only get 30 to 40 cracks at planting season, Jonathan Knutson says. So, enjoy it, even in its difficulties.
Flooding near Oslo, Minnesota, has destroyed agricultural land, washed out their township roads and caused thousands of dollars of damage to a railroad line that carries cars filled with wheat to the West Coast and southern United States.
A North Dakota potato breeder brings in a speaker from Wyoming who has trained a dog to detect potato virus diseases using their nose.
The North Dakota Soybean Processors plant at Casselton and the Green Bison plant at Spiritwood are signs of the growing demand for renewable fuel as well as feed for the livestock industry.

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Anne Waltner, Parker, South Dakota, left a full-time career as a concert pianist and educator to join her parents’ farming operation. Along the way she married, had triplet daughters and survived cancer. Of her journey and life, she says: “Can you think of anybody luckier than me?”
Cold temperatures and excessive moisture have delayed spring planting across the northern Plains.
Jared Goplen, a farmer and University of Minnesota Extension educator on crops and forage, is seeing more interest in small grains in traditional corn and soybean country for a few reasons: soil health, weed and pest management, and benefits to livestock operations.

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