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DNR cautions lake property owners about improper hydraulic jet use

A person may legally operate a hydraulic jet if it is placed high enough off the lake bed

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The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources frequently receives questions about devices that generate water current to blast muck and plants away. They have various trade names, but the DNR refers to these devices generically as hydraulic jets.

Even though you can buy one in Minnesota, they cannot be used in any way that disturbs the bottom of the lake or uproots plants.

A person may legally operate a hydraulic jet if it is placed high enough off the lake bed so that it does not disturb the bottom or destroy rooted aquatic plants. It should be directed upward toward the water’s surface, which can prevent dead vegetation and duckweed from collecting around docks and boat lifts.

Aquatic plants are important to lakes. They help maintain water clarity, prevent erosion, stabilize the bottom and provide habitat for fish and wildlife and are therefore protected under state law.

Specific regulations govern what situations require permits for aquatic plant removal. Regulations and a guide to aquatic plants can be found on the DNR website. To apply for a permit, visit the DNR’s permitting and reporting system.

Our newsroom occasionally reports stories under a byline of "Pineandlakes Echo Journal." Often, the "Pineandlakes Echo Journal" byline is used when rewriting basic news briefs that originate from official sources, such as a city press release about a road closure, and which require little or no reporting. At times, this byline is used when a news story includes numerous authors or when the story is formed by aggregating previously reported news from various sources. If outside sources are used, it is noted within the story.

Send us your news or story ideas by emailing nancy.vogt@pineandlakes.com or calling 218-855-5877. Be sure to leave a message!
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