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From the Lefthand Corner: Facts, factoids and fictions

A fact is an actual thing. It is an object that can be seen and heard and felt and usually can be measured. An event that actually occurred is fact. An action that was actually accomplished is fact. Fact can usually be verified in our present world.

A fact is an actual thing. It is an object that can be seen and heard and felt and usually can be measured. An event that actually occurred is fact. An action that was actually accomplished is fact. Fact can usually be verified in our present world.

Fact is elusive. In the legal trial world we had the standard quip that every driver in an intersection accident contended that he had the green light in his favor. What was, in fact, a fact for one driver became factoid, or believable or not so believable, fiction for another.

We have a deluge of various types of political information and allegation almost drowning us throughout these campaign months. But, we don't have near enough facts to weigh and consider and compare for the pending election.

To help us determine whether that which is stated as fact or alleged as fact is really fact, I guess we now have Fact Check - for those who know how to run a computer. But, that doesn't seem to stem the proliferation of non-facts that are represented and contended as facts.

Those few who know how to use Fact Check and take the time to use it tell me that it doesn't always have the right factual information available either.

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A factoid is a word or phrase or description that is presented as factual and then emphasized and publicized over and over to such extent that it becomes accepted by many as fact. We have a flood of factoids to confuse us and affect us and influence us toward less qualified candidates and election results this year

The major media does a lot of "factoiding." It does so on its own volition, to gain and keep viewership, readership and listenership. It does so, happily, when paid to do so by the pockets of ready money that are pouring vast sums into their advertising coffers.

Our society is strangely approving or at least accepting the continuation of excessive money negatively permeating our politics. That is one of our most depressing facts of all.

The most extreme example of damaging factoid that comes to mind is the horribly devastating assertion of existence of "weapons of mass destruction." That was the classic of the "Bushisms" - that if you tell a lie enough times it becomes a truth - unfortunately true.

Donald "Diatribe" Trump is the master of actually gaining popularity, at least temporarily so, by ignoring facts and loudly proclaiming the political factoids and fictions, and too often discernible lies. Many of us hope the temporary popularity will be more temporary, but the "Trumpers" are still rallying strong. Trump's bombastic blockbuster rolls on, mostly unabated. The Cruz-Kasich agreement appears to be too little, too late, and too likely to backfire.

Just last week a non-partisan fact determination review of Trump's recent major assertions of the week concluded that three of them were: false-false-false.

Trump rages on with a few bloated facts, a pocket full of factoids and quite a bit of fiction. Just a few examples are: He is prepared to be president and presidential. He is prepared to provide adequate healthcare for all. He is always with all of his children and they are always happy and well adjusted. He is ready to take on ISIS worldwide. He stands ready to fix all our trade problems, confronting China and Mexico while at the same time solving our immigration problems.

We may also note that Trump's (as Bernie's) "spontaneous" rallies are increasingly and earlier planned, and tightly programmed, with more paid staffing before, during and after.

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So, political facts are hard to find as we swim through it all, in danger of drowning in factoids and fictions.

We close with the purest of political fiction; still indulged by most candidates and flying around the campaign scenario. Candidates are repeatedly and with straight face "promising" to voters that they will provide more in governmental payments and services than ever, and still cut taxes and deficits.

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