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As I See It: What really matters?

A few years ago, Charles Krauthammer, a syndicated columnist and commentator on Fox News, published a selective collection of his columns titled "Things That Matter." If you change that statement into the form of a question -- no this is not Jeop...

A few years ago, Charles Krauthammer, a syndicated columnist and commentator on Fox News, published a selective collection of his columns titled "Things That Matter." If you change that statement into the form of a question - no this is not Jeopardy - you might discover a way to think about and analyze just about everything in life. Krauthammer's book focused on a wide range of important issues and his analysis of what is right or wrong in our collective approach to those subjects.

To me, truth really matters. As I sat and pondered freedom, one of the recent slogans in our culture, "Black lives matter," came to mind. This started because of a number of shootings of black men by white police officers that were, or appeared to be, questionable in justification. It was further fueled by the murder of black men, women and children in a church in South Carolina. When more than one opinion columnist stated that all lives matter, they were attacked as being racist as though "all" doesn't include "black."

Arguing about the meaning of "all" makes as much sense as arguing about the definition of "is." While black lives matter, in truth all lives should matter to everyone. And I'm not just talking skin color. I'm talking about the young and old, men and women, healthy and sick, obese and emaciated, and any other way you want to slice and dice the human race. But there are two categories that don't matter - the unborn and the elderly.

We have killed over 56,000,000 babies since Roe v Wade, many of them in Planned Parenthood Clinics where these tiny bodies can be sliced and diced for whatever can be sold in the name of research - but the truth lies in one word, "profit." That's over seven holocausts when you think about it. Now, we want to kill the elderly under the guise of compassion or death with dignity. Isn't it amazing what reprehensible actions we can take when we come up with a neat slogan to assuage our consciences and justify the unjustifiable?

Every time we start to say "but wait" to ourselves and others when thinking about or discussing issues of ethics and morality, we're ready to delve into the world of lying to ourselves.

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Speaking of ethics and morality, they really matter. Or perhaps I might observe they should matter. I remember discussing ethics as part of our social studies curriculum in high school. I remember when an extra-marital affair ruined more than one political candidate's future. Now, it's almost a requisite for holding public office. A prominent U of Minnesota Director resigned over a sexual harassment issue, likely before being fired. How many politicians would have the thought of doing the same in that situation? Isn't the "I have done nothing illegal," disclaimer a great source of comfort to all of us when our leaders are caught with their trousers down or their hands in the cookie jars?

Freedom really matters, but every time a legislative body passes a new law, it likely restricts you and me in some small way. Outside the legal arena - at least for the present time - the area of public speech is certainly being constrained by political correctness (PC). A conservative voice will likely be drowned out by both faculty and students on nearly every college and university in this country; academic freedom is a joke.

The "death by a thousand cuts" torture method is nothing compared to what the PC mafia inflicts on us every day. We never seem to accept formal, legal censorship of any kind, but say something truthful (but unacceptable) about blacks, women, gays, and others and you will be pilloried by many, including the media that doesn't understand the truth either.

The truth can be beautiful; more often it is harsh and ugly for it too often reveals us at our petty, grasping, greedy, venal, and immoral levels. We are supposed to strive to rise above those levels aren't we? Why is it our very culture that makes it so hard?

So, what matters to you and why?

That's the way I see it.

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