AccuWeather Global Weather Center – Despite several days of dry, mild weather for many of the North Central states leading up to the official start of astronomical spring on Saturday, Mother Nature isn't quite ready to let go of winter just yet.

A large storm is set to begin to develop across the nation's midsection early this week, after it brings accumulating snow to the Rockies. Early this week, an area of low pressure will eject eastward out of the southern Rockies and into the southern Plains, where it will begin to strengthen.

By Tuesday, AccuWeather meteorologists say this storm will be able to spread a swath of stormy conditions that reach from the United States' Gulf Coast to southern Canada. While many across this wide swath will receive precipitation in the form of rain, some residents in the northern U.S. and southern Canada are set to encounter precipitation of the frozen variety.

"Cold Canadian air dragging in behind this storm will provide the necessary ingredients for a bit of snow across portions of the north-central U.S. Tuesday night and Wednesday," AccuWeather Meteorologist Adam Sadvary explained.

Parts of South Dakota and Minnesota may begin the day Tuesday with rainfall, but as chilly air quickly filters south, a changeover to a mix of rain and snow is likely for these same areas. As cold air continues to be pulled into the storm Tuesday evening, a full transition to snow may occur for northern Minnesota and portions of southern Canada.

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"Due to the track and nature of this storm, varying snow totals will be possible over short distances," Sadvary said.

Just how long warm air is able to hang on before cold air wins out across different portions of the state will ultimately determine the amount of snow residents will need to shovel.

"In cities like Duluth, Minnesota, where rain will mix with snow at times, only a coating to an inch is likely, but for areas not much farther north, where precipitation is expected to be mostly snow in Canada, half a foot of snow or more can accumulate," Sadvary explained.

While rain is set to begin the transition to snow as early as Tuesday evening for portions of Minnesota and South Dakota, snow may have a difficult time accumulating.

"Snowfall may struggle to stick to roads and sidewalks, as temperatures have been running well above average so far this month across the North Central states," AccuWeather Meteorologist Renee Duff explained. "For example, temperatures in International Falls, Minnesota, have averaged a whopping 12 degrees above normal, with St. Cloud, Minnesota, not too far behind at 9 degrees above normal month-to-date."

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