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The Vault

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Haskell Bohn, kidnapped for ransom in St. Paul in 1932 because he was heir to a refrigeration fortune, struck up an unlikely 'friendship' with his Sankey Gang captors, talking baseball and bull riding, according to police records exclusively obtained from a descendent by Forum News Service.
The mystery of who robbed a Wahpeton bank in September 1932, endured until the man bragged about it 40 years later. He was 'Public Enemy No. 1' and 'the scourge of the Midwest.'
Minnesota has its share of extreme weather: the Halloween blizzard of 1991, The Red River flooding of 1997, the Twin Cities tornado outbreak of 1965, the Comfrey-St. Peter tornado outbreak in 1998 and the 1999 'Boundary Waters Blowdown.'
"The part that is not resolved is not going to be resolved ever," the victim's daughter said after the sentencing. "He's obviously not going to admit to this at all, whatsoever."

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Jaden Woodworth describes his memories of his mother, and tells how police claims drove a wedge between him and his father -- and how Dakota Spotlight's debunking of those claims might help reconnect them.
The son of Minnesota manufacturing millionaire, Haskell Bohn appeared to be a flashy guy. Unfortunately for the Bohn family in St. Paul, Bohn's flash caught the attention of the Sankey Gang, a notorious criminal organization housed out of neighboring Minneapolis.
“Waterville friends of the murderer said he could drop five quail with as many shots, and the unarmed wardens had no chance at all," said a contemporaneous newspaper account of the encounter.
Built deep within a wooded area on the outskirts of Duluth, the topography of the area was thought to be optimal for housing — and hiding away — patients who had contracted tuberculosis.
History is a huge part of the identity of the Dodge County seat of Mantorville, but even long-time locals are intrigued by the hidden past just off Main Street.
The All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, formed as male ball players were being drafted into the military for World War II efforts, allowed more than 600 female players a chance to shine and get a paycheck to play their game on a national stage. It was immortalized in popular culture by the movie "A League of Their Own" and a new streaming show by the same name.

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As Minnesota's territorial population exploded in the mid-1800s, workers began organizing and unionizing to fight for their rights, though it sometimes turned deadly.
James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok was undoubtedly carrying at least one sidearm in the gold mining town of Deadwood in what was then Dakota Territory. So what happened to Hickok's gun?
Joel Lovelien, 38, was beaten to death outside of the Broken Drum Bar in Grand Forks the weekend before Halloween on Oct. 27, 2007, while in costume as a hockey player.

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