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Patriot Perspective: Staying active is the key to healthy aging

In every phase of life there are key arenas we focus on in order to make sure we are setting ourselves up for future success, or someone is making sure we are taken care of.

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Seniors can also take advantage of local class offerings to engage their mind right here through Pequot Lakes Community Education. You can learn how to crochet or knit. We have watercolor and art classes. We offer cooking classes like beginner sushi, marinades and grilling, as well as how to manage your abundant garden at summer's end. PineandLakes.com Illustration

In every phase of life there are key arenas we focus on in order to make sure we are setting ourselves up for future success, or someone is making sure we are taken care of.

As a baby, we pretty much ate and slept all day. As young children, our parents and families made sure we learned manners, ate our vegetables and developed social skills through play and activities.

As we grew through our school-age years, we developed discipline, work ethic, responsibility and the like through homework, school sports, part-time jobs, etc. These were the "keys" to our success.

So what are those "keys" as a senior citizen. As baby boomers age, research abounds in regard to the best ways to grow through your senior years. It has been proven through research over and over that activity decreases the risk of disability, increases energy levels and helps to create a positive view of oneself.

The Harvard School of Public Health has found evidence that the elderly people in the United States who stay socially active and engaged have a slower rate of memory decline. So I guess the "key" is to stay active, but how?

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As a senior, there are multitudes of ways to stay active. Many seniors find activity and social interaction through church and community groups, while others find satisfaction and activity as part of local Lions clubs, Rotary clubs, local Legions and the like. All of these groups and organizations offer ways to socially interact as well as be part of opportunities that give back to the communities they reside in and serve through events and activities.

Seniors can also take advantage of local class offerings to engage their mind right here through Pequot Lakes Community Education. You can learn how to crochet or knit. We have watercolor and art classes. We offer cooking classes like beginner sushi, marinades and grilling, as well as how to manage your abundant garden at summer's end.

You can sign up for water aerobics, senior golf or learn how to make everyday care and cleaning products with essential oils. We also have historical information presentations about how Brainerd helped win World War II, the Shipwrecks of Minnesota, and the Roaring Twenties. We also offer Community Theater productions and shows through Greater Lakes Area Performing Arts, with the upcoming performance of the Heartland Symphony Orchestra as an example.

The offerings of Pequot Lakes Community Education really do "run the gamut." These offerings will allow you to learn some new things, meet some new people and possibly give back to your community.

In a world where technology and advancements in medicine help us to be mobile and healthy for longer and longer, don't forget to take advantage of the opportunities right outside your door.

Please feel free to contact Pequot Lakes Community Education at 218-568-9200 for information on our classes and offerings.

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