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University of Minnesota bus crashes into a restaurant building in Minneapolis

The extent of the damage wasn’t clear although the bus was halfway into the building in photos of the crash posted to social media.

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A University of Minnesota bus is seen protruding from a building after it reportedly crashed into the Acadia restaurant, bar and music venue in Minneapolis on Tuesday, March 15, 2022.
Henri Johanson / The Current via MPR News
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MINNEAPOLIS -- Minneapolis fire officials say a landmark West Bank building was badly damaged when a University of Minnesota bus crashed into it Tuesday afternoon.

The bus crashed into the south side of the Acadia Café at 325 Cedar Ave., just after noon on Tuesday. The building, located on the northeast corner of Cedar and Riverside avenues, has hosted well-known and long-celebrated gathering places, including the Coffeehouse Extempore, a folk-music landmark.

Fire officials said that no one was in the restaurant at the time, although the bus had a single passenger on it. Neither were hurt. Fire officials say they believe a crash between the bus and a passenger car preceded the crash into the building.

Engineers were called in to assess the structural integrity of the building, and the utilities were shut off as a precaution. The extent of the damage wasn’t clear although the bus was halfway into the building in photos of the crash posted to social media.

Related Topics: CRASHESMINNEAPOLIS
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