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Missing University of Minnesota student found dead in Mississippi River

Austin Retterath had been missing since May 8.

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MINNEAPOLIS -- A University of Minnesota student who was missing since May 8 has been found dead.

The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension announced Friday that 19-year-old Austin Retterath's body was found in the Mississippi River on Wednesday. He was last seen near the river at East River Parkway and Franklin Avenue, just southeast of the university campus in Minneapolis.

The bureau said there were no signs of foul play.

An obituary for Retterath on a funeral home website says he was born in Wausau, Wisconsin, graduated from East Ridge High School in Woodbury, Minnesota, and was on the University of Minnesota’s College of Science and Engineering’s Dean’s List.

“He had many hobbies including playing basketball, cheering on the Packers, spending time at the lake with his family and friends, and visiting new places with his family,” the obituary said, adding that he leaves behind his parents and two older siblings.

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Related Topics: MINNEAPOLISMISSING PERSONS
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