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Minnesota woman admits to $860K Medicaid fraud

Prosecutors said Trenea Deshawn Davis recruited family members and friends to feign and exaggerate medical conditions in order to qualify for personal care assistants. They then falsely reported care services and split the money, according to the attorney general.

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MINNEAPOLIS — A Minnesota woman has entered guilty pleas in a case stemming from a scheme that defrauded a state medical assistance program out of more than $860,000, Attorney General Keith Ellison announced Tuesday, Jan. 18.

The Medicaid Fraud Unit of the Minnesota Attorney General's Office in 2021 charged Trenea Deshawn Davis and seven others, mostly family members, with running a five-year-long benefits scam on Minnesota's Medicaid program.

Prosecutors said Davis recruited family members and friends to feign and exaggerate medical conditions in order to qualify for personal care assistants. They then falsely reported care services and split the money, according to the attorney general.

Davis, who as a part of her plea agreement admitted to running the ring, reported working as a care assistant for more than 7,000 hours between December 2014 and May 2018 before taking on the role of patient and reporting 12 hours of care a day.

Davis pleaded guilty to five counts of aiding and abetting theft by swindle and will be sentenced Feb. 15. Of her seven co-conspirators, six have pleaded guilty, according to the Attorney General's Office.

Alex Derosier covers Minnesota breaking news and state government for Forum News Service.
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