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Proposed development remains contentious for Nisswa City Council as preliminary plat is not approved

Donors to K9 Shuri's vest recognized

Donors for K9 vest for Nisswa K9 Officer Shuri.jpeg
Nisswa Police Officer Conner Collette and K9 Officer Shuri are shown with Carey Rasinski, owner of The Animal House in Nisswa, which donated funds toward a K9 vest for Shuri.
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NISSWA — The Nisswa City Council tackled two items regarding land use at its regular meeting Tuesday, May 17.

The council, with council member Mark Utzinger absent, agreed not to adopt a Crow Wing County moratorium regarding shoreline development, but rather to have staff look at, update and correct existing city ordinances and present that revised material within three months.

A moratorium is not needed at this time until ordinances are looked at, the council agreed.

City staff will look at wetlands, boardwalks and shoreland rules within the current city code of ordinances to facilitate revisions to provide better direction for others.

Last month, the Crow Wing County Board agreed to enact an all-out ban on administrative subdivisions within the shoreland district and a yearlong moratorium on any new boardwalks or other structures crossing wetlands to ease access to navigable waters.

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Roy’s Landing development

Deviating from the planning commission’s recommendation, the council denied approval of a preliminary plat for Roy’s Landing because unanswered questions remain that could have future impacts.

The council continued its meeting to 6 p.m. May 26 for staff to develop findings of fact supporting the denial.

The planning commission had recommended approval of the preliminary plat for a proposed development of six single-family residential building sites on 26.5 acres.

No new roads are being proposed at this time and the development would be served from Roy Lane and Bass Lake Road. No construction is being proposed on the building sites at this time. A boardwalk for lake access was built.

Nearby residents have vehemently opposed this preliminary plat, specifically an easement for a future connection between Roy Lane and Bass Lake Road and an easement for an access path.

In other land use action, the council approved the Next Shift Enterprise/Quarter Mile Depot preliminary plat, with conditions, to subdivide a 10.9-acre parcel off Lower Cullen Road into nine single-family lots. No construction is proposed at this time.

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Vest for Shuri

The council accepted the following donations for a K9 vest for the city’s K9 officer, Shuri; $2,500 from Sourcewell, $2,300 from the Nisswa Lions Club, $200 from Robin Carbone and $500 from The Animal House.

An April report showed Nisswa police had 178 calls for service and 27 agency assists; issued one criminal citation, 20 traffic citations and 108 traffic warnings; and made six arrests.

In March, police had 203 calls for service and 27 agency assists; issued one criminal citation, 18 traffic citations and 127 traffic warnings; and made 12 arrests.

In other business May 17, the council:

  • Approved 2022-2023 liquor licenses.
  • Approved a draft street name sign policy and procedure. This policy standardizes installation of street name signs and establishes how the city is reimbursed by private developments/streets to install street name signs.
  • Reappointed Dil Stachour to the Public Works Committee through 2026.
  • Approved a Minnesota Department of Transportation master partnership contract through 2027.
  • Agreed to add three concrete pads under the ballfield bleachers for $5,040 from Shingledecker Concrete & Construction, Inc. in Pillager.
  • Agreed to accept a proposal for a parks and recreation master plan from HKGI for a cost not to exceed $34,500. The proposal includes the addition of the Camp Lincoln option.

Council member Don Jacobson was opposed.

  • Learned Pickle Factory Manager Terry Wallin was elected to the Minnesota Municipal Beverage Association board of directors.
  • Learned Spirits of Nisswa received a Minnesota Municipal Beverage Association Facility Award for its training platform.
  • Accepted a $2,680 donation from the Minnesota Twins Community Fund for parks ballfield improvements.

Nancy Vogt, editor, may be reached at 218-855-5877 or nancy.vogt@pineandlakes.com. Follow her on Facebook and on Twitter at www.twitter.com/@PEJ_Nancy.

Nancy Vogt is editor of the Pineandlakes Echo Journal, a weekly newspaper that covers eight communities in the Pequot Lakes-Pine River areas - from Nisswa to Hackensack and Pequot Lakes to Crosslake.

She started as editor of the Lake Country Echo in July 2006, and continued in that role when the Lake Country Echo and the Pine River Journal combined in September 2013 to become the Pineandlakes Echo Journal. She worked for the Brainerd Dispatch from 1992-2006 in various roles.

She covers Nisswa, Pequot Lakes, Lake Shore and Crosslake city councils, as well as writes feature stories, news stories and personal columns (Vogt's Notes). She also takes photos at community events.

Contact her at nancy.vogt@pineandlakes.com or 218-855-5877 with story ideas or questions. Be sure to leave a voicemail message!
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