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John Wheeler

John Wheeler

Meteorologist

John Wheeler is Chief Meteorologist for WDAY, a position he has had since May of 1985. Wheeler grew up in the South, in Louisiana and Alabama, and cites his family's move to the Midwest as important to developing his fascination with weather and climate. Wheeler lived in Wisconsin and Iowa as a teenager. He attended Iowa State University and achieved a B.S. degree in Meteorology in 1984. Wheeler worked about a year at WOI-TV in central Iowa before moving to Fargo and WDAY..

Wheeler covers weather for WDAY TV and radio, as well as for The Forum and for inforum.com. Most meteorologists find stormy and extreme weather fascinating and Wheeler is no exception, but his biggest interest is severe winter weather.

About 30 percent of the total population now live in a county adjacent to an ocean.
Florida is a difficult place to evacuate from.
We all learned this in primary school, but the chemistry is actually quite complex.
Anemometers are located only in a few select locations, making it very unlikely that an actual maximum wind will be captured.
As the weather gets colder, changes happen more frequently and are more noticeable.
Weakened remnants of hurricanes and tropical systems have historically moved across portions of the Midwest.
Science fiction is good at showing future technology but often not as good at showing future society.
Aurora do not cause changes to our weather patterns.
The two main factors of these changes are warming oceans and warming air in the polar region.
A wind report is measured by an anemometer at a location free of obstructions at 10 meters (about 33 feet) above the ground.