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Faces: Jarvi recognized for resilience

Meghan Jarvi was one of the Pine River-Backus students nominated as a Student of Character in the annual Sourcewell event. Jarvi's nomination letter recognized her resilience in the face of loss. Travis Grimler / Echo Journal1 / 2
Meghan Jarvi was one of the Pine River-Backus students nominated as a Student of Character in the annual Sourcewell event. Jarvi's nomination letter recognized her resilience in the face of loss. Travis Grimler / Echo Journal 2 / 2

As people go through difficult times in their lives, it can sometimes seem like their struggle has gone unnoticed. Pine River-Backus senior Meghan Jarvi was surprised to find that not to be the case.

Jarvi has gone through difficult times. In her life she has overcome challenges, including social anxiety, but the most difficult challenge was recovering from the loss of a close friend.

"About 2015 I had lost a very good friend of mine to suicide," Jarvi said. "It was very difficult for me to deal with and sometimes it still is. I think I was able to take that and make myself better out of it and learn to deal with it in the proper way and more celebrate her life than to grieve."

Jarvi faced a challenge that any warmblooded person would find difficult, but she didn't let that stop her from moving forward. That perseverance did not go unnoticed.

Her teachers, Nicosia Danielowski and Naomi Horn, submitted the following nomination to the Sourcewell Students of Character recognition:

"Meghan works hard, shows exemplary work and is driven. She has persevered through the emotional challenges of losing a family member and friend. She is a quiet leader who unselfishly devotes her time to help other students, traits that led to her election as concert choir president. Her willingness to improve herself has shown others that tough times do not have to define you. Meghan plans to attend Vermilion Community College in the veterinary technician program. Her kind and compassionate nature will serve her well in this field."

Jarvi had never heard of the award until high school Counselor Mary Sigan asked her for contact information so she could send documents and information to Jarvi's parents.

"I felt pride," Jarvi said. "I guess it is a small town but usually good deeds go recognized. There aren't a lot of people so it kind of gets around. You get recognition straightaway. I guess I didn't think I was doing a whole lot that went unrecognized. I thought I was just doing what I do all the time, just how I am."

Jarvi felt vindicated at the award ceremony.

"It felt really good. I felt very proud of myself," Jarvi said. "It shows that sometimes I don't think I'm as good a person as I really am. Everyone has their doubts and it really showed me I am good."

Jarvi had words of encouragement for those, like her, who quietly go through challenges.

"Even if you aren't always recognized for what you do, never stop doing the things you do," Jarvi said. "People do notice it even if it doesn't seem like it. There have been people that feel like they aren't getting enough attention for something they do so they don't do that stuff anymore because they don't feel like they are getting what they deserve."