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2022 Cuyuna Lakes Visitor Guide

Iron mine pits reclaimed by nature to create pristine lakes for kayaking and canoeing, now stocked full of trout and brimming with possibilities. Bike rails worthy of global acclaim now wind through this beautiful land we are so proud to call our backyard.

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Detail from the cover of the 2022 Cuyuna Lakes Visitor Guide.
Photo courtesy of Andy Goble
We are part of The Trust Project.

Welcome to the Cuyuna Lakes

The residents and business owners of Cuyuna Lakes invite you to experience all that our unique destination has to offer – where small town charm meets the great outdoors. We’re honored you’re interested in visiting and are excited to have you as our guest.

Our tale was forged by the sweat, sacrifice and toil of the men and women who uncovered the minerals that built the backbone of this great region.

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The barren mine pits that remained were reclaimed by nature to create pristine lakes now stocked full of trout and brimming with possibilities. Trails worthy of global acclaim now wind through this beautiful land we are so proud to call our backyard. So, get off the beaten path and come explore.

We welcome you during any season to experience how our area is embracing change. There are very few times in life that you can be part of a story this big in a region this small.

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From state parks and national forests, to private and municipal campgrounds, camping options abound.
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