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2021 Progress Edition

A look at what's been accomplished thus far in 2021, and what to look forward to!

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Detail from the 2021 Progress Edition cover published in the Brainerd Dispatch and PineandLakes Echo Journal.
We are part of The Trust Project.


Our economy has roared back, which was really hard to imagine when we had the COVID closures in late 2020.

- Matt Kilian, Brainerd Lakes Chamber of Commerce president

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Table of Contents:

Worker shortage dominates • Next generation of Haglins continue entrepreneurial spirit • Breezy Point celebrates 100 years • Escape in the sky • Sew-sew work in Outing so rewarding • Father-son duo open burger company in Staples • Great outdoors proves COVID proof • Finding a groove: Aitkin Hardwoods reshapes itself • Enterprise Academy helps businesses succeed • Do you have the best job? • Bringing classics back to life • Keeping the day rolling, one cup at a time

Related Topics: NORTHLAND OUTDOORS
I've worked at the Brainerd Dispatch with numerous job titles since Dec. 7, 1983. Starting off as an Ad Designer and currently as Digital Editor. The Dispatch has been an interesting and challenging place to work these 30+ years. I was present and worked on the our web page when our original BrainerdDispatch.com website first went live on April 26, 1994.
What to read next
Conservationists have spent years trying to stave off a national decline in hunting and fishing, but the 2020 pandemic appears to have righted a sinking ship.
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The North Dakota Soybean Processors plant at Casselton and the Green Bison plant at Spiritwood are signs of the growing demand for renewable fuel as well as feed for the livestock industry.
Quaal Dairy in Otter Tail County sold off most of its herd in April. Vernon Quaal says the 2021 drought drastically cut into its feed supply and the rising prices for feed made maintaining the 300 cow herd unstainable. Quaal says many dairies are suffering. But he is determined to build back up, with a crop of bred heifers ready to calve in September.