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Who are we without our memories?

Two-year-old Edie shares a special moment with her best friend, Gramma Ginny. Jessie Veeder / Forum News Service1 / 2
Jessie Veeder, Coming Home columnist2 / 2

Last week, Edie caught her first fish off of her great-grandparents' dock on a little lake in Minnesota.

After her daddy helped her pull that bluegill out of the water using the little orange fishing pole with the button reel that has likely caught many grandkids' first fishes, she inspected its puckered mouth, ran her fingers over its scales, looked toward the shore and yelled at the top of her lungs, "Gramma Ginny, look! I caught a fish!"

Gramma Ginny is Edie's 80-something great-grandmother who is known to her family as a woman who loves to play bridge, has read thousands of books, is probably magic because she can float in the water for hours without paddling and refuses to look on anything but the bright side in life. This is a quality that is seeing her and her family through the difficult and inevitable process of time that has taken her quick wit and memory, but has not broken her spirit.

Edie calls gramma Ginny her best friend, and like any best friend, she was thrilled by her little granddaughter's first catch. I watched them celebrate with a lump in my throat wishing time would stop for a moment.

Edie, don't get bigger just yet. Gramma, don't get older. Warm sun, don't go down on Lake Melissa today; just hang in the sky a little longer and shine on my mom in her swimsuit as she floats out to the sailboat with her sisters. Don't set on these cousins getting to know one another and growing up too fast. Don't stop our laughing and start our worries. Not yet. Hold still now, time.

"It's a beautiful day. A good day," said Gramma Ginny over and over as all 10 of her great-grandchildren, from 7 months to 14 years old, navigated their relationships to one another over games of beanbag toss, squirt gun fights and kayak trips to the lily pads.

"Yes, yes it is Gramma," we would reply, all of us reliving old memories of swim lessons from aunties, rainy day card games and mosquito slapping by the campfire, wishing we didn't know that our matriarch's memories slip in and out like waves as she holds on tight to her husband's hand and wades into the familiar feel of the cool lake water towards her grown daughters with children and grandchildren of their own.

I looked at my grandparents and thought about the 60-some years of a life they've lived hand in hand like that and I wondered how it is that I want to stop the very thing that has given them so much adventure and fulfillment and love.

What do we know if we can't remember it all?

Who are we without our recollections, our stories? Our memories?

We are my 2-year-old daughter, fresh and eager to discover a mysterious new world, and her great-grandmother, two best friends celebrating a catch in a special moment on a good and beautiful day.

Jessie Veeder is a musician and writer living with her husband and daughters on a ranch near Watford City, N.D. She blogs at https://veederranch.com. Readers can reach her at jessieveeder@gmail.com.

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