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As I See It: Inspiration

I don't know how many of you feel about the Bible, but whether you believe it is historically, spiritually, socially or otherwise accurate, it is still an amazing source of thought-provoking tales, stories, wisdom, guidance and material for meditation.

I have to admit I get a lot of inspiration for more than a few of my columns from daily readings or analyses of Gospel passages, especially as they relate to events in the world today.

Chapter 11 of Genesis tells the tale of the Tower of Babel. In those times, people were migrating and started settling in a valley in southern Mesopotamia called Shinar. Babel is a Hebrew word for Babylon, by the way. The people said to one another, "Come, let us build ourselves a city and a tower with its top in the sky and so make a name for ourselves; otherwise, we shall be scattered over all the earth."

The Lord saw what was going on and the selfish motivations that had surfaced and how they were trying to become an end unto themselves and so as their punishment, he confused their language so that one could not understand another. From there, the people scattered all over the earth anyway.

Do we not see so many examples of us trying to make a name for ourselves by building a more imposing home than our neighbor? Or maybe it's a larger, faster, flashier boat or car.

I don't really begrudge or envy those who have gobs more money than the rest of us; I just wonder sometimes if they ever realize how much good it would do in helping others. It's hard to foster unity when we are living in a society of one-upmanship, isn't it?

Hurricanes Harvey and Irma have both added considerable fossil fuel to the global-climate change bonfire. After all, how could it possibly be that we have had two back-to-back, once-in-500 years hurricanes hit the United States if not for global warming?

How on earth do we know this hasn't happened before? Of course, Houston, the Florida Keys, Marco Island and other places weren't exactly populated long ago. I think the whole world needs to read "Chicken Little" once a month to have their perspective refocused.

I want to find the well-intentioned buffoon who came up with 500-year claim ... might it not be only 350 years ... or maybe 1,000? This was done for emphasis and certainly not for accuracy, but given the state of much of our public education system, far too many people drink the Kool-Aid freely and believe it all without a second thought.

Suppose it happens again next year; what then? Science doesn't have all the answers they think they have. Which brings me to the Gospel of Matthew, Chapter 23, wherein Jesus is criticizing the Scribes and Pharisees: "... for they preach but they do not practice." "They tie up heavy burdens and lay them on people's' shoulders but they will not lift a finger to move them. All their works are performed to be seen."

Has anyone in the country seen Al Gore's electric bill for his palatial compound? I understand several dozen copies of his latest book have actually been purchased.

And how about the jet-setting Hollywood types, CEOs and politicos who tell us how to live while living in their own "Tower of Babel" houses and flying around on fossil fuel-guzzling airplanes to getaways in Cannes, Paris, Hoboken or Sevastopol?

Are we really supposed to listen to them?

I am against pollution in the water, air or anywhere else. I don't want children to breathe dirty air or drink dirty water. But I know we can't achieve the level of purity demanded by too many know-it-alls without destroying a major part of the world economy.

I've said it before and I'll say it again. If mankind and human activity are the tipping point in global climate change we will be unable to alter the behavior of a sufficient number of earthlings to turn the Titanic before it hits the iceberg.

I don't know how far back this game goes, but as far as I can tell the score is still Mother Nature batting 1.000, mankind .000!

Hope, pray and don't worry; but please turn out the lights.

That's the way I see it.

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