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Grim's Grub: A pasta extruder to call my own

I had an idea for a product that would make at-home pasta production simpler using an equally simple tool that most hunters in our area already have. We even have companies in the area that could produce such a product. PineandLakes.com Illustration

Months ago I toyed with the idea of an invention that I am still convinced could hit it big, but I was quashed by limited resources and limited knowledge.

You see, I had an idea for a product that would make at-home pasta production simpler using an equally simple tool that most hunters in our area already have. We even have companies in the area that could produce such a product.

My problem is twofold. First, I don't know computer-aided design. Second, I don't have the capital it would require to produce a prototype or start a production run.

If I knew CAD programming, I could make the parts necessary to extrude all shapes and sizes of pasta, either just for myself or in larger quantities. If I had capital, I could hire someone who knew CAD and pay for a production run.

Alas, for now this is another idea that will go into my "if only" pile.

Homemade noodles are attractive to me for the same reason I like wild food. When you control your food, that means you are self-sustaining and you can control the end result. Want something nutritious and possibly healthier than store-bought? There is no better way.

To get me by, I purchased a manual Atlas Regina pasta extruder to make my macaroni, penne and other pastas. As a result, I have been dreaming up flavored pasta noodles infused with powders and flours like mushroom, spinach, potato, chickpeas and other nutritious and flavorful additives.

This is advantageous to you, my loyal reader, because today I will share with you some of what I have learned. Without an extruder, I'm afraid many people will be limited to the tedious task of rolling out flat noodles on the countertop or extruding them through a meat grinder like I demonstrated more than a year ago. They will still taste better than your store-bought varieties, but with limited textures.

P.S. If you know CAD and want to join forces and make pasta extrusion even more accessible, get in touch.

Chickpea Pasta

From https://www.abeautifulplate.com/the-new-pasta-on-the-block/

  • ¾ cup chickpea flour
  • 1 ¼ cup unbleached all-purpose flour
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ½ cup warm water
  • 2 tablespoons oil

Stir together the dry ingredients and then make a mound with a well. Add water and oil to the well, then slowly mix the liquid and dry ingredients together.

Cover the dough with plastic wrap and let it sit for 5 minutes. Knead the dough for 10 minutes. If the dough is properly made it will be tacky, but your hands should stay clean. If your hands have pieces of dough sticking to them, the dough is too wet and needs more flour. If you have flour caked to your hands (a slight dusting is acceptable), it may be too dry and needs water.

Wrap it again and let it sit 30 minutes.

Spinach Pasta

From https://www.marthastewart.com/314301/fresh-spinach-pasta-dough

  • 6 ounces spinach
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 large egg yolk
  • 2 ½ cups all-purpose flour plus more for dusting
  • Coarse salt

Steam spinach until it is bright green and softened. Squeeze out liquid and then puree in a food processor. This should result in approximately ½ cup of puree.

Add eggs and yolk to the puree in the processor and process until combined. Add flour and 1 heaping teaspoon of salt, then process until the dough just begins to come together, about 20 seconds.

Remove from processor and knead on a well-floured surface, approximately 5-10 minutes, adding up to 2 tablespoons of flour if it is too sticky. Wrap in plastic and allow to rest 1 to 2 hours.