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Grim's Grub: Read for the history, subscribe to make more

Sure, with the internet and social media, certain small town history gets recorded in other places, but not so thoroughly as one would find in an official publication. Years from now the bound copies of the PineandLakes Echo Journal will remain one of the most reliable historical records for Pine River and Pequot Lakes out there, maybe one of the only records. Such is the case for Pine River 75 years ago as well.

History is a big deal, considering everything we now know goes back to it (literally). But funny turns of phrase aside, writing has given us a great tool that has allowed us over the years to record what once was for future record.

It's not perfect, but without the writings of those who witnessed great events firsthand and have since died, we'd have a lot more questions than answers today. I'm glad for the authors and other documentors of our past.

The one problem is that the most prominent history writers were focused on big places and world-changing events. New York, Virginia and California did not have a monopoly on history in our country, but the likes of Pine River and Pequot Lakes have far fewer records of written history available. Universally, small places like ours documented their history in personal journals (most are probably gone today) and newspapers like the one you read now.

Sure, with the internet and social media, certain small town history gets recorded in other places, but not so thoroughly as one would find in an official publication. Years from now the bound copies of the PineandLakes Echo Journal will remain one of the most reliable historical records for Pine River and Pequot Lakes out there, maybe one of the only records. Such is the case for Pine River 75 years ago as well.

That being said, this column is continuation of a tradition that goes back to the Pine River Journal's early years. In honor of that, I'm going to reprint some recipes from 1938. I hope you enjoy, and I hope you keep supporting your local newspaper. Thank you.

Jan. 30, 1938, Orange Cupcakes

  • 2 eggs
  • sour cream(softened)
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 ½ cup flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ¼ cup melted butter
  • one orange

Break two eggs into a cup, fill the cup with sour cream. Beat with a dover egg beater. Add sugar. Beat well. Add sifted dry ingredients and then melted butter. Use grated rind of one orange for flavoring. Bake in moderate oven (I'm guessing 350 degrees) for 20 minutes.

January 13, 1938, Shrimp Creole

  • 2 medium size onions sliced
  • ¾ cup sliced celery
  • 2 tablespoons shortening
  • 1 tablespoon flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 cups canned tomatoes
  • 2 cups canned peas
  • 1 tablespoon binegar
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 cups shrimp
  • 3 cups hot boiled rice

Cook the onions and celery in the fat until a delicate brown. Add the flour, salt and chili powder and blend until smooth. Add the water (use liquid from the peas as part of the water). Cook until thick and smooth, stirring constantly. Add the tomatoes, peas, vinegar, sugar and shrimp and beat thoroughly. Serve with the hot rice.

March 17, 1938, (Nursery Sweetmeat) Honey Candy

  • butter
  • 1 pound extracted honey
  • teaspoon lemon extract
  • icing sugar

To make honey candy — butter a pan lightly. Pit in one pound of extracted honey. Boil brisdkly for 20 minutes, or until the honey hardens when dropped in cold water. Pour into a buttered dish, and with a knife blade work in a teaspoonful of lemon essence. When cool enough to handle, dip the fingertips in icing sugar and pull honey until opaque. Form rolls or twists and cut into pieces.

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