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Be careful about what you believe

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I had a smart, wonderful little dog. But once in a while I’d tease her. That wasn’t nice, I know. I’m not perfect, yet.

I found if I knocked on something, and in an excited voice said, “Who is that?” emphasizing “is,” she’d go nuts and run to the door, barking furiously.

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When I went to a company training school in Baltimore in the ‘70s, the police (in this case call them “cops”) would park their K-9 cars in the semi-downtown area we were in. The dogs were trained: When someone walked by, the dog would watch quietly. But if a black person walked by, the dog would go crazy, barking, snarling, drooling, throwing himself (or herself: equality, ladies!) against the windows.

Can you imagine how you, or your child or grandchild, would feel if you were black?

People can be easily trained the same way. I attended an informational meeting on Islam and Muslims a few weeks ago (at the Pequot Library. Thank you!). A couple questions from the audience revealed some people are letting themselves be conditioned the same way as dogs, in some cases by false religions, in other cases by sources far more sinister and secretive.

The unreasoning hatred was palpable. Just like the police dogs.

Everyone must be careful what they allow their minds being sucked into. We have to watch our wallets; people will try to steal our money. They’ll try to do the same to something far more valuable: our minds, and our essence as human beings.

It’s easy to get sucked in; addicted. Just as Rush Limbaugh had gotten sucked into being an Oxycontin drug addict a while ago. (Fortunately, he escaped that when it caused him to lose his hearing. Now if he could just work on the other thing.)

A. Martin,

Merrifield

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Denton (Denny) Newman Jr.
I've worked at the Brainerd Dispatch with various duties since Dec. 7, 1983. Starting off as an Ad Designer and currently Director of Audience Development. The Dispatch has been an interesting and challenging place to work. I'm fortunate to have made many friends, both co-workers and customers.
(218) 855-5889
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